Which is easier 100,000 wikis for teachers or 100 blogs for principals?

Scott McLeod over at Dangerously Irrelevant is starting a campaign to get 100 principals to blog in 100 days. A few weeks ago, wikipsaces issued a challenge to give out 100,000 wikis to teachers. I think they’re at about 14,000.

I’m wondering which is the more realistic goal?  Wikis can easily be used and justified as throw aways, that is used for a brief or specific purpose and not used again. I personally have about 15-20 wikis on the go. Blogs can be throw aways as well but I think Scott is looking for principals who will take up blogging as part of their practice.

I’ve been searching for these pioneers as well. Currently, my school division has only one blogging principal that I know of. Principals are busy people. Blogging is a bit like starting an exercise regime. You might think it’s good for you but it seems tough to fit it into your schedule. Many or most aren’t even at the point where they see the benefit.

I’m skeptical of this project succeeding. Prove me wrong.

Here’s the project page with all the details

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  • Dean, you skeptic! There are something like 16,000 schools in the U.S. and umpteen more in Canada and across the globe – we’re only looking for 100 principals! =)

    Obviously we’re hoping to prove you wrong. It’s going to be interesting!

    BTW, thanks for the principal blog URLs you posted as a comment on Dangerously Irrelevant. We added them to our running list of principal blogs (http://principalblogs.jot.com/WikiHome/tr0) – if anyone runs across anymore, please let us know!

  • You can add me to your list. I am a K-6 Principal and Director of Technology Planning in Puyallup School District in Washington.

    I started AlmostMonday.BlogSpot.Com as my staff bulletin this fall.

    My original blog is PepTechTalk.BlogSpot.Com.

    I recruited the following principals in my district to start blogs:

    Arturo Gonzalez – CarsonLeadTeam.BlogSpot.com

    Scott Britian – RamReview.BlogSpot.Com

    Marc Brouillet – ZeigerExplorers.BlogSpot.Com