And Another Reason Why You Don’t Blog

…and by you, I mean me.

…and by blog, I mean reflect.

I have written recently about why you can’t click publish. Certainly it’s a thing for many folks. But then there are a bunch of you who say, “I have nothing to write about”. I get it. I haven’t written anything for a month. For me, that’s not good. Mr. Mega Blogger himself, George Couros recognized a slump he was in and talked about his lack of consumption. He’s right. When I first began blogging, I recall Will Richardson say that blogging was mostly about reading. The reason you blog is not just that you have something to say but mostly that you have something to respond to. The past month for me has been pretty full of presenting and traveling and teaching which often means a lack of opportunity to reflect. It’s really not a great excuse because I think, like exercise, you need to figure out ways to make time. If indeed we think reflecting is important, if we want our kids to be reflective, we better start modeling it. My students are asked to reflect and it’s been over a month since I have done … Read the rest

The anatomy of a Skype call

This post was last updated on September 5th, 2011 at 11:03 am

I respect Gary Stager's opinion. He pushes my thinking. That's what he did for me here:

Why would you Skype someone involved “in the process?” What process? Who? State legislators? What are they likely to tell a student that can’t be found out in a book or article?

The connections you speak of, now matter how much you yearn for them may be as inauthentic as the task itself. Perhaps they just make a task nobody cares about even more arduous. The “you can use Google ____ or Skype with someone” suggestions have become as automatic and meaningless as when a politician says, “We need to pay teachers more, but hold them accountable.”

To be fair, Gary's comments here were about a broader issue and he goes on to discuss it in more detail. For me the striking comment that “skyping someone in” is often a automatic response to trying to demonstrate you have a classroom that “gets it” gave me pause to think. While I applaud teachers who consider this strategy, without thought and purpose it has no more value or impact that asking a Read the rest